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Summer Update

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Summer Update

We don't do much blogging these days, what with novel writing and an active two year old keeping us busy, but we thought a quick update was in order. This summer we're releasing four novels.

The first, Magic Hunter, was released on May 17th. It's also the first in The Vampire's Mage Series. 

The second book releases on the 15th of June. It's called Witches of the Deep and is the final book in the Memento Mori Trilogy--our Young Adult series. We're pretty excited about finishing a whole series of novels!

In July we're releasing Infernal Magic, the third book of the summer. It should be out a few days after the 4th of July. Like Magic Hunter, it's the first book in a brand new series. 

The forth book will be Witch Hunter coming in August. If you guessed that it's the sequel to Magic Hunter, you're right.

These are all set in the same world, so you can delve in deep with three series!

 

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A psychological perspective on writing talent

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A psychological perspective on writing talent

Ryan Boudinot’s article about teaching writing has been ruffling a few feathers. There are those who approved of his frank assessment of writing ability (you either got it or you don’t), and those who found it obnoxious. Here’s what it says:

"Either you have a propensity for creative expression or you don't. Some people have more talent than others. That's not to say that someone with minimal talent can't work her ass off and maximize it and write something great, or that a writer born with great talent can't squander it. It's simply that writers are not all born equal." 

Chuck Wendig does not agree. In fact, he’s angry.

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  The Dark Side of Fantasy

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The Dark Side of Fantasy

ON THE WHOLE, FANTASY WRITERS THINK A LOT ABOUT THE PAST.

There are classic medieval-inspired epic fantasies, of course, but even contemporary urban fantasy draws on ancient folklore in the form of vampires, demons, and fairies. As Michael Moorcock pointed out in his often-quoted essay about epic fantasy, there are different ways for a fantasy writer to approach history.

A writer can romanticize bygone days of rolling hills, round wooden doors, and leafy forests. Or, an author could go the other way, scouring history’s dark side—picking over the bones of bludgeoned kings, botched executions, and the frenzied witch-hunting mobs—the murky days before modern science, when feeding a urine-cake to a dog could identify a witch.

. . . and that brings us to dark fantasy.

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